The news of late is all about subprime loans, foreclosures and what the effect will be on the Vermont real estate market. The Sunday issue of the Burlington Free Press had an article which said foreclosures are on the rise, mostly due to an increase in defaults in higher risk subprime loans. What are subprime loans, and why should we care here in Burlington?
 
Simply put, subprime loans are offered to borrowers who may not fit a conventional financing product most buyers use. They may have some credit issues, or maybe income that is not acceptable for conventional loans. The mortgage loan closes at a higher rate (typically 2-4% above conventional rates) and are usually adjustable rate loans. When the loan adjusts, the borrowers payment increases significantly, and can result in difficulty making the increased mortgage.
 
Vermont has one of the lowest percentages of suprime loans versus conventional in the nation per CNN Money. An increase in foreclosure filings does not necessarily mean an increase in foreclosed homes, which remains to be seen. Stay tuned.
 
-Nancy
 
 
 
Mortgage payments hit hard

Published: Sunday, March 25, 2007
By Dan McLean
Free Press Staff Writer

Late mortgage bills are stacking up in an increasing number of Vermont households.

Foreclosures in Chittenden County -- where last year's median-priced home cost $269,900, nearly $64,000 more than the median-priced Vermont home -- jumped 37 percent from 2005 to 2006.

There were 158 foreclosures filed with Chittenden Superior Court in 2006, the highest number filed in Chittenden County since at least 1997, according to County Clerk Diane Lavallee. In January and February, there were 29 additional foreclosure filings, she said. If that pace continues, there will be 174 foreclosures in the county this year. (read more)